Exhibit Archives

Michigan and the War of 1812
200th annivseray of the start of the war of 1812

This year is the 200th Anniversary of the start of the War of 1812, a defining conflict in the history of our nation, yet one which is mostly forgotten or glossed over in our history textbooks. At the outbreak of the war, Michigan was still just a “territory”, part of the great Northwest Territory, which included the future states of Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin and Minnesota.


The War of 1812 is the only conflict in our nation’s history to witness battle on Michigan soil. A number of important forts and trading posts, including ones at Mackinac Island (Fort Michilimackinac), Detroit (Fort Detroit), and Frenchtown (Monroe, MI) would play pivotal roles throughout the war and would ultimately determine the strategy of both the Americans and the British with their Indian allies.


The Frankenmuth Historical Association has put together a fascinating exhibit, exploring Michigan’s role in this forgotten war, featuring photographs, paintings, text panels, Native American artifacts, and a collection of extremely rare uniforms and weapons. “Michigan & the War of 1812” is open to the public and is hosted in the Leona Geyer Gallery at the Frankenmuth Historical Museum, located at 613 S. Main St.


Admission to the special exhibit is included in the regular museum admission fee of $2/adult, $1/students, and $5/family pass. The FHA is also offering a special “2 for 1” admission deal now, where anyone paying admission at either the FHA Museum or the Lager Mill Museum of Frankenmuth Brewing History, will get into the other museum for free as well. More information on the FHA and its exhibits can be found on this web site or on our Facebook.

John F. Kennedy Exhibit
a tribute to the life and legacy of JFK

November 22, 1963, the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, is one of the dates in American history, along with Pearl Harbor and the 9/11 attacks, where nearly every American remembers their exact location and what they were doing when the awful news broke. It was also the first major event in our country’s history to be covered in depth by the new technology of television, bringing the tragedy right into the living room of nearly every American household.

 

The Frankenmuth Historical Association commemorates the 50th anniversary of this terrible event with a special exhibit entitled “Kennedy”, a tribute to the life and legacy of America’s 35th President. Through rare photographs, text panels, video footage, and artifacts, visitors will experience the life of John Fitzgerald “Jack” Kennedy from his early childhood as one of nine siblings in an Irish Catholic family, to his success as a young writer, and through his heroic exploits in WWII as a naval officer in the Pacific; from his meteoric rise to the top political office in the country, through the challenges he faced both home and abroad during his presidency to his tragic assassination in Dallas and the controversial aftermath. You will meet not only Kennedy the President, but also Kennedy the husband, father, and brother.

The “Kennedy” exhibit runs through the end of 2013 and admission is included in the normal Frankenmuth Historical Association museum admission of $2/adult, $1/student, or $5/family. In addition, any paid admission gets that guest a free admission to the Lager Mill Museum of Frankenmuth’s Brewing History, located just down the street. 

from bread baker to bread winner

 

2014 marked the 100th Anniversary of Mother's Day, but the roles of women in our society have changed greatly in that century. This exhibit explores Women's Suffrage, the Great Depression, Women in Advertising, and Women at War, among other things. Also includes a Frankenmuth "Women's Wall of Fame", celebrating home town success stories and those who have given their time and efforts for the betterment of the community. Exhibit runs through Summer 2015.  Admission to this exhibit is included in the regular admission price for the Frankenmuth Historical Association museum.

Fairy Tales from the brothers Grimm

 

2014 marked the 100th Anniversary of Mother's Day, but the roles of women in our society have changed greatly in that century. This exhibit explores Women's Suffrage, the Great Depression, Women in Advertising, and Women at War, among other things. Also includes a Frankenmuth "Women's Wall of Fame", celebrating home town success stories and those who have given their time and efforts for the betterment of the community. Exhibit runs through Summer 2015.  Admission to this exhibit is included in the regular admission price for the Frankenmuth Historical Association museum.

 

Starting in 1812, the German brothers Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm published a collection of 86 stories, gathered from cultures throughout Europe. They ultimately had 211 tales in a seventh edition. Next to the Luther Bible, the Grimm stories are the most widely disseminated work of German literature ever.

 

The brothers’ “Children's and Household Tales” (German: Kinder- und Hausmärchen) is commonly known in English as Grimm's Fairy Tales. The collection of folktales contains some of the best-known children’s characters in literary history, from Snow White and Rapunzel to Cinderella and Little Red Riding Hood.

 

The exhibit features artwork from various editions of the story collection, including reproductions from illustrator Arthur Rackham, one of leading artists of the “Golden Age” of British book illustration in the early 1900s, when high quality books were often given as Christmas gifts.

Grimm fairy tales appeal to adults and children on different levels, as does the exhibit. Explore the history of the Grimm Brothers and the origins of their tales. View the complete list of their works, and see how the most popular have become woven into our culture today - from Disney to television drama.

The original tales included much darker themes, which the brothers, and later Disney, sanitized. The exhibit includes a special cabinet containing a book of the original tales - for adults to explore.

 

Children know the famous princesses, Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty (originally Little Briar Rose), Rapunzel and Snow White - and can read their stories as told by the Grimm Brothers in books in a reading nook. For children, other hands-on activities include a puppet theater and costume try-on.

Two centuries later, we still want to know how evil is punished and humble heroes rewarded. Visit our fairy tales exhibit and share these stories again.

 

 

The Edmund Fitzgerald

 

Learn about the illustrious history and tragic end of the Great Lake’s most famous freighter.  Photos, text, video, and rare artifacts, combine to tell the compelling story of “The Mighty Fitz”.

Now through early Spring!

A Tigers Tale

135 years of
Detroit Baseball

“A Tiger’s Tale” highlights the history of the past 135 years of the Detroit Tiger’s baseball franchise. The exhibit is largely made up of photos with captions of the highlights of the team throughout the years. Included in the exhibit besides the photos are a signed bat by Ted Williams (considered the greatest hitter in baseball history), signed photographs, tickets from the early 1900’s, baseball jersey’s, and an interactive component which allows visitors to make their own lineup from players throughout Tiger’s history. It’s a cool exhibit that even non-baseball fans will enjoy!

* AND *

Community Bands of the Area

"I’d take this to a New World"

German      U.S.

Art Exchange

Only here for a few weeks! – “I’d take this to a New World – German/U.S. Student Art Exchange” has opened at the FHA. An art exchange between the students of List Elementary and the Primary School of Nordhalben in Germany took place within the last few weeks. While discussing the emigration of settlers in the late 1800’s and the fact that they had to bring so little with them, art teacher Irmgard Freischlad thought it would be a good project to draw the one thing they would bring with them if they were to emigrate to another country. Students of List Elementary did the same and drawings between the two schools were then exchanged to see the differences that German and American children would have if they were to bring one thing with them on an emigration trip. They are currently on display at the museum until they will be sent back and displayed at the school in Germany. Stop by to check it out!

Rebel With a Cause

Come see our exhibit and learn how Martin Luther

accidentally started his own religion and how,

500 years later, he is still making an impact on our world.

Runs September 2017 - January2018

Now through Mid-March

Support for the Frankenmuth Historical Association is provided in part by grants from:

(989) 652-9701

Frankenmuth Historical Museum  

613 S. Main St. Frankenmuth, MI 48734